Specialized Fatboy 20″ and 24″ Preview

If you hadn’t already heard, The Specialized Fatboy has been a popular bike ever since it’s launch last year, and the interest in fat bikes is growing more and more every year. The big question for riders who already know the allure of fat bikes is – when are they going to make a kid’s version? The following Fatboys are reported to be coming soon, but as of now, delivery and pricing is not published for the US market.We got the following info from the internet and put it together in one place to give you the answer to questions you might have. Take a look at these great looking models for the little rippers – we’ll keep you posted as soon as they’re available for order and in Erik’s locations.

UPDATE – The first shipment of these bikes is expected in mid-december, and both sizes will retail for $999.99. We will have information on our website by the end of the weekend here, but you can pre-order one today at any of our 22 Erik’s locations.

2015 Specialized Fatboy 24

Inspired by the adult version of the Fatboy, the 2015 Specialized Fatboy 24 is built on a fully-butted A1 Premium Aluminum frame and fork and features a 1×9 drivetrain anchored by a Sram X4 rear deraileur and a trigger shifter. Designed for kids on the go, the aluminum rims are a fat-specific (90 mm ride) 24 inch disc rim with 32h lacing and Specialized Ground Control 24×4.0 tires. Hub spacing is 170mm in the rear. Stopping power comes by way of a Tektro Aries mechanical disc brake.

20115 Specialized fatboy 24 in Black / Rocket Red / Teal

20115 Specialized fatboy 24 in Black / Rocket Red / Teal

2015 Specialized Fatboy in Hyper Green/Cyan/Royal Blue

2015 Specialized Fatboy in Hyper Green/Cyan/Royal Blue

2015 Specialized Fatboy 24 WHT/PNK/FUCHSIA/INDIGO

2015 Specialized Fatboy 24 WHT/PNK/FUCHSIA/INDIGO

2015 Specialized Fatboy 24 in Black/Turquoise/HyperGreen

2015 Specialized Fatboy 24 in Black/Turquoise/HyperGreen

2015 Specialized Fatboy 20

The only thing the 2015 Specialized Fatboy 20 skimps on is size. Built on a fully-butted A1 Premium Aluminum frame and featuring the same 170mm rear hub spacing and the same SRAM X4 1×9 drivetrain. Featuring 20×4.0 Ground Control tires, young riders should have no problem going where mom and dad go on their full sized fatties. See the colors below – these are preliminary colors and could change slightly depending on availability. Like the 24 inch model, the Fatboy 20 is equipped with Tektro Aries mechanical disc brakes. Geometry for both bikes is available at the end of the post.

2015 Specialized Fatboy 20 Indigo/Coral

2015 Specialized Fatboy 20 Indigo/Coral

2015 Specialized Fatboy 20 - Royal BLue / Moto Orange / Gallardo Orange

2015 Specialized Fatboy 20 – Royal Blue / Moto Orange / Gallardo Orange

2015 Specialized Fatboy 20 White / Turquoise / Pink

2015 Specialized Fatboy 20 White / Turquoise / Pink

2015 Specialized Fatboy 20 Charcoal / Teal / Hyper Green

2015 Specialized Fatboy 20 Charcoal / Teal / Hyper Green

2015 Specialized Fatboy 20/24 Geometry

Specialized Fatboy 24" Geometry Specialized Fatboy 20 GeometrySpecs on these models should not be considered final, but geometry numbers are reliable if you’re looking to figure out which one is a better fit for your little fat-biker. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask one of Erik’s experts at one of our Minnesota or Wisconsin locations.

What is a Direct-Drive Trainer and why is it good for cycling?

As cyclists, we like the idea of actually riding all year long, and the rise in fat bikes is great for that, but sometimes your schedule doesn’t allow to get outside and the short winter days can be a challenge for cyclists. For this reason, trainers, rollers and indoor cycles are often a must for riders in the Upper Midwest.

What’s your goal?

We often talk about what your goal is with a trainer – whether you just want to log some virtual miles, stay loose and active, or work on a specific skill such as strength or power in cycling. All of the available options Erik’s carries can meet these needs, and in unique ways. There’s a newer technology, however, that you may not be aware of: direct drive trainers. In an effort to squeeze every bit of performance out of a trainer and make it incredibly easy to use, this is the result.

The Kickr from Wahoo Fitness

The Wahoo Kickr is Erik’s most popular direct drive trainer and offers distinct advantages over traditional rear wheel trainers.

The Basics

At the heart of any direct drive trainer is the frame and resistance unit, but how it connects to your bike is the first thing you will likely notice. Direct Drive Trainers effectively replace your rear wheel. By removing the stock wheel on your bike, and placing your bike on the unit, all that’s needed is to make sure the chain is in place on the gears and tighten the quick release skewer. There is no rubber tire and as a result, switching back and forth between training and riding outdoors is easier than with any other option. This makes direct drive trainers a great way for mountain bikers to utilize a trainer without investing in a trainer tire or second wheel.

What Makes Them Unique?

Aside from the attachment method, what makes a direct drive trainer unique will depend a lot on the model, but we’ve found in general that the FEEL is unlike anything else we have ridden. When pedaling, especially at start-up, the feeling in the legs is almost indistinguishable from riding on real pavement. The units Erik’s stocks start with a similar frame and a heavy fly wheel inside of a housing – this is where much of the realism comes from, but each unit takes a different approach to resistance units. All of these units are fairly heavy, making them super stable, especially under hard efforts. If you are a rider who like to go to the point of blackout on your intervals, then there really is no better option than direct drive.

Direct Drive vs. Indoor Cycles

Indoor cycles such as the Pro Form and models from CycleOps have traditionally been the most feature rich options for riding indoors, but some people don’t have the space to dedicate to them, making it an impractical option. With heavy flywheels and a ton of adjustment options, they do provide great flexibility for multiple riders and a great workout. With all of the options including power measurement, the ability to virtually ride courses and vary intensity is great for your workout, but they come at a cost. Direct Drive trainers offer a lot of options and realism over standard rear wheel trainers, but at a fraction of the cost of an Indoor Cycle. The most full featured option of direct drive trainers (Wahoo Kickr) costs half of what a similarly featured indoor cycle does.

The Models

The Cycleops Silencer is a magnetic resistance, and super quiet meaning you won't disturb the rest of the house with your killer workouts.

The Cycleops Silencer is a magnetic resistance, and super quiet meaning you won’t disturb the rest of the house with your killer workouts.

The Silencer from CycleOps features a magnetic resistance unit starts at $659 and is built with the same rugged reliability and life time warranty that CycleOps products are known for.

Resistance is adjustable with an included remote and offers 5 different resistance levels in addition to the normal gear shifting on your bike.

Compatibility is limited to SRAM and Shimano drive-trains and will accept 9/10/11 speed cassettes. The $729 version includes a 10-speed Shimano cassette.

Weight of the Silencer is 39 lbs, and is optimized for 700c wheels without the need to add a riser block. Mountain bikers will want to add one to level the bike.

The Elite Turbo Muin is a favorite among Erik's staff who really like to push hard in their workouts.

The Elite Turbo Muin is a favorite among Erik’s staff who really like to push hard in their workouts.

The Turbo Muin by Elite has a fluid resistance unit, and is a great option for riders who like to get the absolute most from their trainer workouts. It’s max wattage is the highest of these three at a leg-crushing 2500 watts at 90 RPM, making it ideal for strong riders looking for high-intensity workouts.

Resistance on a fluid unit such as the Turbo Muin is what we refer to as progressive, meaning it gradually increases with speed. The result is that by working through your gears and increasing wheel speed, the resistance gets harder. This resistance curve is designed to copy the feel of riding on the road.

Compatibility like the CycleOps comes out of the box as SRAM/Shimano 9/10/11-speed but an option is available for Campagnolo freehub bodies as an aftermarket piece.

Weight is similar to the Silencer at 39 lbs as well, though one thing that differentiates the Turbo Muin is the ability to fold the frame for storage.

The Kickr from Wahoo offers a great deal of options to get the most out of your training this winter.

The Kickr from Wahoo offers a great deal of options to get the most out of your training this winter.

Wahoo Kickr lists for $1098.99, making it the most expensive option Erik’s offers in this category, but with good reason. The Kickr measures power and can be connected with a Bluetooth 4.0 or ANT+ connection meaning you can control the unit with an iPad, iPhone or other device as well as track power data with compatible computers like the Garmin Edge line.

Resistance is variable through the app, Bluetooth compatible computers or even a connected PC computer by using an ANT+ dongle. It is also compatible with a whole host of third party options such as Strava, Trainer Road and more, as well as Wahoo’s own app.

Compatibility like the previous models is optimized for Shimano and SRAM 9-11 speed cassetes and comes with a 10 speed cassette. Like the Turbo Muin, it can be adapted to fit Campagnolo 11 speed. Like all direct drive trainers, it does well with mountain or road bikes in a variety of wheel sizes.

The weight is an impressive 45 lbs for the Kickr, but since the legs also fold away and it includes a carrying handle, moving it is not difficult.

One of these three options are a great way to up your trainer game this winter and be ready to ride outside at a moment’s notice. The major benefits aside from realism are ease in setting up the trainer and the ability to easily keep your bike ready to ride outdoors, making it not only a good option for the off-season, but also great for conditions early and late in the year that making getting out on the road or trail tough.

Best bag for Traveling with Snowboards

Got travel plans this winter? If you’re headed out west or just trying to maximize space for a trip that includes skiing or snowboarding, we always recommend a snowboard bag for its cavernous space. Burton’s Wheelie Gig Bag this year fits the bill perfectly and comes in a color that’s hard to miss as it spins around the baggage claim carousel.

Burton Wheelie Gig Bag 166

The Burton Wheelie Gig Bag is 166 cm in length and we’re stocking it in the Fish Blanket pattern for your next adventure. The Gig bag is padded to protect your board and can fit multiple boards (with bindings off) as well as a great deal of your gear. If you pack right, you can keep it down to one bag and save money on baggage fees.

Check out our video below on how to best pack for your big skiing or snowboarding trip and see just how much you can fit this winter.

Indoor Cycling – Are rollers or trainers better?

It happens every fall in the Upper Midwest. Days grow shorter, the weather turns cold, and then we go switch the clocks back forcing everyone who loves to ride a bike to adapt. You could get a fat bike and fight off the winter blues, but let’s face it, you might not be ready for that yet (When you are, we’re more than ready to help). Whether or not you’ve trained inside in the winter, you might not be aware of the options of HOW to ride – the most common of these are a stationary trainer or rollers.

Which is better?

Most people starting out often go for the trainer – it’s a small piece of equipment that folds up and stores under a bed or behind a couch pretty easy, and it’s easy to turn an existing bike into a very good workout. Rollers are a bit bigger, but still compact and stowable – they feel a lot more like RIDING a bike, but they do require skill to learn at first (this skill does make a more capable rider out of roller users though). At Erik’s we can recommend one for you based on your unique needs and goals, but there’s a place for both of these in your home to get the most out of your workouts and to keep indoor cycling and training as fun as possible.

Some cyclists prefer trainers to rollers.

Trainers

Trainers work by holding the bike stationary in an upright position. There’s no need to balance with wide and stable legs. This set up, along with built-in resistance units makes this an excellent choice for developing strength as a rider.

Pros
  • High Stability allows riders just to focus on moving their legs and not on balance.
  • Good for loosening up or short workouts.
  • Great tool for riders doing high-intensity workouts like intervals or other anaerobic work.
  • Ideal for anyone doing rehab after surgery or strengthening after an injury.
  • Great for one-legged drills used in addressing imbalances or leg weakness.
Cons
  • Does not address handling or balance issues.
  • Fixed position can be uncomfortable for endurance work.
  • Extra pressure on the tire requires the use of a trainer tire for best performance and protection of your regular tires.
  • Lacks the most realistic road feel.

Rollers offer a ride that is more interesting than trainers

Rollers

Rollers are a long frame with a single drum up front and two drums in the back to support the bike. With 16″ of width under your bike, you’ve got some room to move, but not near as much as riding down the road. Rollers are often considered the ideal method for becoming a more complete cyclist. They force attention much like riding outdoors would. For riders new to rollers or those looking to ad versatility, it is possible to add a resistance unit and a fork stand and make it behave more like a trainer.

Pros
  • Promote even, rhythmic cadence from the rider.
  • Great for developing tracking skills and maintaining control of the bike.
  • Good tool for developing balance.
  • More stimulating to ride and less chance of boredom.
  • Quieter than the quietest fluid trainers.
  • No need to change out tires from your regular riding tires.
Cons
  • Not ideal for high-intensity interval training unless you are a very skilled rider.
  • Requires some skill to learn to use (learning curve).
  • Does not allow rider to “zone-out” in the same way as a trainer.

 

The Bottom Line

So which is best? Depending on where your desires match with the above pros and cons of each, there’s one that will fit your unique needs best and give you something to do this winter, but if you’re not the only rider in your household or you want your next season of riding to be the best ever, we feel there’s a place for both in your house. We even mentioned in a previous post about keeping trainer time entertaining by making it a group ride.

If you’re prone to getting lost in a workout or training at high levels of exertion, a trainer is an ideal option. Doctors and physical therapists often recommend cycling as a low impact activity following an injury or surgery related to hip replacement, ACL repair and other knee or leg surgeries. Trainers allow you to easily isolate a leg and work on strength building specific sides of the body.

Rollers obviously require some time to adapt as you are balancing the bike on a smaller space than you may be used to, but many riders report less boredom and actually look forward to riding the rollers. They can be a great way to work on your pedal stroke (aka souplesse) and since your upper body is far more active, they can help develop core strength related to cycling and improve your ability to maintain a line.

Whatever you choose, know that you are setting yourself up for better fitness and a more enjoyable cycling season whether or not you agree with the idea of an “off-season.”

Ride Report – Hunting by Fat Bikes

Interest in fat bikes has grown incredibly in the past few years, and often people seeing one for the first time wonder “What do you use THAT for?” The past couple winters in Minnesota and Wisconsin have answered those questions pretty well, and more riders every year are making them their number one bike. As a tool, though, they sometimes get overlooked, and we think incorporating bikes into other parts of your life is a great thing, whether it’s commuting to work, running errands or taking a trip. Erik’s employee, Dave, and myself (Lainger) both are avid hunters when it’s not prime biking season, but that’s not to say we wouldn’t jump at the chance to ride more. This past weekend we had the opportunity to take out a couple CB4 fat bikes from Cogburn Outdoors (a hunting and fishing specific bike from the Quality Bike Products family).

For a brief overnight, we brought along the CB4s with slightly different set ups and loaded them on the rack. We headed to Northern Minnesota in search of the elusive Ruffed Grouse and the bikes soon proved their worth.We settled on a spot a few miles down the road from where we were staying – Using paper “PRIM” maps and online resources and thought it looked like a good start. It was 3:00 on a Saturday afternoon when we pulled into a small parking space next to an ATV trail. Dave’s bike was outfitted with a rack and the Cogburn Gear Carrier; mine was not. The gear carrier is a well thought out piece of metal that straps to the rear rack or cargo carrier of the bike, and you can then attach fishing rods, archery equipment, shotgun or rifle to easily, and it does a plenty good job of keeping it out of the way but easily accessible. By comparison, I had to case and strap my shotgun to my back. While this was a stable mount that worked well for our purpose, it poses a problem when the trail gets tight, and it could certainly be more comfortable. To allow for hunting boots, we both opted for a flat pedal rather than clipping in as we normally would. We dressed to be moving, but were comfortable in tin chaps and jeans with breathable layers up top and a hunting vest.

The two CB4s at rest near the end of the trail. The bike in the foreground has the Gear carrier for easier carrying of guns, rods and bows.

The two CB4s at rest near the end of the trail. The bike in the foreground has the Gear carrier for easier carrying of guns, rods and bows.

Setting out felt like the beginning of a great adventure – starting so late in the day, we wouldn’t usually be able to cover a lot of ground before dark, but on bike we were able to cover 3 miles pretty quick and access some land that was new to us easily. The added benefit was that the bikes were a blast to ride, and while a walking hunter can move at 2.5 to three miles an hour, this eats up time to get some place. By taking fat bikes, we got to where we wanted to go and were able to stow the bikes so we could walk the most promising parcels of land.

Wearing a helmet is a good idea, but since blaze orange is a legal requirement, we opted for regulation over habit.

Wearing a helmet is a good idea, but since blaze orange is a legal requirement, we opted for regulation over habit.

Hitting the trail is a blast on a fat bike, and on ATV trails, the wide footprint of the 4 inch tires inspired confidence in ruts and wet sections of the trail.

Hitting the trail is a blast on a fat bike, and on ATV trails, the wide footprint of the 4 inch tires inspired confidence in ruts and wet sections of the trail.

Places where it would be hard to walk are where the CB4 shows its worth.

Places where it would be hard to walk are where the CB4 shows its worth.

Grouse hunting puts you in areas like this often, and the bikes would be more work then we wanted, so when we found a promising spot, we stowed them.

Grouse hunting puts you in areas like this often, and the bikes would be more work then we wanted, so when we found a promising spot, we stowed them.

Set in a low spot and locked to each other, the CB4s were safely away and out of sight of most.

Set in a low spot and locked to each other, the CB4s were safely away and out of sight of most.

It's easy to get lost in the thick stuff - Dave and Willow work a bit of cover in search of birds.

It’s easy to get lost in the thick stuff – Dave and Willow work a bit of cover in search of birds.

On the way out, we rode past a promising spot but opted to keep going. It could have been because the riding was so much fun, or it could have been the excitement of the adventure and the ability to keep pushing further, but we passed it up. After riding to the end of the trail though, we had the opportunity to come back at it. We parked the bikes well off the ATV trail in a depression and good cover. As a precaution, we locked the bikes together and set about to work the brush. For its size and convenience, I like the Abus Catena to lock up the bikes – it’s a fairly sturdy chain, but it is lightweight and packs down to the size of a softball roughly. After heading a mile out, and not seeing any birds, we turned around and worked back to the bikes. We would have loved to get a couple birds for dinner, but knowing this doesn’t always happen we were glad we planned ahead and brought dinner. Normally I would recommend setting a waypoint using a GPS when you stow something in the woods, but we had some good landmarks that would ensure we would find the bikes again. Though I will freely admit to walking about 20 feet past the bikes and not noticing them with the Realtree camouflage and mottled vegetation surrounding them. It was approaching 5 PM when we arrived back at the bikes, and we knew with sunset at around 6, we should be making a move out of the woods. We unloaded and stowed the guns for the ride back and unlocked the bikes. We were surprised to find we covered the 2 miles back to the truck in just around 15 minutes! Back in the lot, we wiped the extra dirt and mud from the bikes but the smiles on our faces weren’t as easily removed.

Fat bikes can be a tough fit in a car rack, we had good results with the Saris Freedom and upgraded wheel trays to fit fat tires.

Fat bikes can be a tough fit in a car rack, we had good results with the Saris Freedom and upgraded wheel trays to fit fat tires.

Driving back to our place for the night, we talked about the possibilities these bikes opened up for us. It’s easy to think how with the addition of a trailer it could be a great rig for deer instead of an ATV, and we discussed the merits of the gear carrier (Dave pretty much won this one as he never tagged a tree branch with one end of the gun or another) – with a canoe or kayak rig towed behind it could be a great setup for waterfowl hunting too. I liked the internal frame bags you can see in the picture above as a place to stow the lock and camera while riding, and they would come in equally handy for extra gear on wet or cold days as well as first aid kits or items that require ready access.

The following morning we explored a Wildlife Management Area about a half hour away. We always like to scout for new hunting spots and this one showed some promise. We parked the truck again and hopped on the bikes to follow an old railroad grade 1.2 miles to its end – this time the path was closed to motorized vehicles making the Cogburns a perfect fit. The spot should be a great place for ducks when the migrators start coming down, but we still wanted to explore it a bit more since we had some left over time before we had to head home. We threaded the wide bars through a stand of thick popple to an island of oak trees about 4 acres in size. The outer edge of this “island” was bound by a mass of young trees so thick it was like walking through a maze. A great spot for grouse in some cases. We again locked the bikes to each other and thought about leaving the dog to watch over the bikes but thought she would have more fun in the thick stuff, so we trusted the lock (we probably didn’t need to rely on the lock, but when your only way out is on your own, you make sure to plan accordingly). In some of thickest cover around, we jumped one grouse, but given the lay of the land, it escaped pretty quickly as we played twister in the thick brush.

Willow keeps a lookout to protect the bikes. Or maybe she sees a squirrel.

Willow keeps a lookout to protect the bikes. Or maybe she sees a squirrel.

We rode back with empty game bags, but the trip was anything from a loss. Fat bikes like the Cogburn are a great way to get out in the woods and do something different from the normal routine. A bike is a tool when properly used that can carry you and your gear to places where the only limitation is your ability to think of all the possibilities. I know I’ll be using a fat bike again this year for more than just getting on and riding. What’s the most amazing thing you’ve done with a fat bike, or what’s on your fat bike bucket list if you haven’t done anything out of the ordinary yet? Let us know in the comments.

Burton Apparel Spotlight – Burton Dunmore Jacket

So you’re not into technical outerwear, that’s cool, but seriously, it’s time to ditch the denim on the slopes. You’ll be warmer, drier, and you’ll enjoy your days on the mountain so much more if you’re covered with a jacket that’s meant for snowboarding. So if you’re in the market for a new shell this year or know someone who’s still rocking the Carhartt coveralls, we think you should check out the Dunmore Jacket from Burton.

Screen Shot 2014-10-15 at 4.22.12 PM Burton Dunmore jacket 2015 - True Black

 

The 2015 Dunmore Jacket from Burton is a great piece to take from mountain to town with added length and a tailored fit paired with workwear styling. Erik’s carries this jacket in the colors shown above (Woody and true Black). With Thinsulate™ insulation and a brushed flannel lining, you’ll stay warm on cold days. The shell is a two-layer polyester made of recycled bottles and is waterproof and breathable (10k/10K). It also sports a removable fleece hood and a waist gaiter/spray skirt to keep out snow if you are in the deep stuff. find the Dunmore Jacket at select Erik’s locations or online by checking it out HERE and clicking “Find In Store”

Minnesota and Wiscsconsin Mountain BIking Guide

Sometimes you need a break from the same old trail you usually ride. The following guide is meant to inspire you to take a trip and enjoy some of the best mountain biking that Minnesota and Wisconsin have to offer. We’d also love to hear you favorite day or weekend trips for mountain biking. Let us know in the comments and we’ll make sure to add them to the ride guide. Click on the pictures below for more information on the trails.

 

Minnesota Trails

 

Cuyuna Lakes Mountain Bike Area – Crosby/Ironton, MN

For roller-coaster like fun, Cuyuna Lakes in Crosby, MN cannot be beat, and offers a multitude of activities for the whole family!

For roller-coaster like fun, Cuyuna Lakes in Crosby, MN cannot be beat, and offers a multitude of activities for the whole family!

 

Wisconsin Trails

 

Chequamegon Area Mountain Bike Trails (CAMBA) – Cable/Hayward, WI

Chequamegon (CAMBA Trails) is considered the Midwest mecca of mountain biking. It's easy so see why with so many miles of trails.

Chequamegon (CAMBA Trails) is considered the Midwest mecca of mountain biking. It’s easy so see why with so many miles of trails.

 

Levis-Trow Mounds, Neillsville WI

Levis-Trow Mounds in Wisconsin offers beautiful vistas and miles of singletrack.

Levis-Trow Mounds in Wisconsin offers beautiful vistas and miles of singletrack.

Burton Re:Flex Bindings – new at Erik’s!

In our last post, we discussed the Burton ICS system and EST bindings, both items that Burton has developed in order to create a board that flexed better, provided better contact, and a better mounting system. These ideas have been the holy grail since the mid-90s. There are a whole parade of binding names that offered the answer to this problem including Preston, Excel, Tech Nine and more. None of these were bad, in fact at the time they were the most technical thing around, but we still had to put up with bone-jarring landings and weird mounting to make it all happen.

For riders not on a Burton board using the channel system, there’s a great option to get more from your current board with the Re:Flex offering of bindings from Burton. The secret to this technology is in the disc and frame of the bindings. By using a hinged disc and removing material from the base of the binding, Burton creates a binding that is lighter, with better ride responsiveness and allows the board to flex more evenly across it’s length than a traditional 4×4 or even previous 3D hole system board.

Note the removal of material along a line between the mounting holes. By placing this perpendicular to the direction of flex, the binding can flex with the board in this spot.

Note the removal of material along a line between the mounting holes. By placing this perpendicular to the direction of flex, the binding can flex with the board in this spot.

In removing some of the material from the binding, Burton is also able to improve the cushioning under foot to create a more comfortable ride.

What Bindings are Re:Flex and which are EST? At Erik’s we have marked the bindings on our web site as EST if they are an EST binding, so anything without this designation is a Re:Flex binding. This includes the Genesis, Cartel, Mission, Custom and more – see the whole line of 2015 Burton Snowboard Bindings online or at select Erik’s Locations. Take a look below for some of the styles available.

 

2015 Burton Stiletto Binding (Women's) 2015 Burton Mission Binding 2015 Burton Cartel Binding

AWOL x Poler Limited Edition from Specialized

We just got this awesome new ride in from Specialized, but if you want one, you better hurry – there are only 100 of these Specialized AWOL x Poler collaborations made, and we’ve got a size medium and a size large. Scroll through the photos below, specs are listed at the bottom. To see more of the AWOL line, visit an Erik’s near you. These bikes can only be sold direct to a customer, no online sales.

The AWOL x Poler from Specialized is Built for Adventure, but there's only 100 available and when they're gone, they're gone.

The AWOL x Poler from Specialized is Built for Adventure, but there’s only 100 available and when they’re gone, they’re gone.

The limited edition AWOLxPoler edition comes with a front rack and Poler panniers

The limited edition AWOL x Poler edition comes with a front rack and Poler panniers

The frame of this collaboration is a beautiful tangerine orange, detailed with pine cones and needles.

The frame of this collaboration is a beautiful tangerine orange, detailed with pine cones and needles.

With a wide range, the AWOL x Poler edition from Specialized is a rugged option for leading where the road, trail or spirit take you.

With a wide range, the AWOL x Poler edition from Specialized is a rugged option for leading where the road, trail or spirit take you.

Spectacularly detailed, the POler Limited edition AWOL from Specialized is the perfect bike for some serious adventure.

Spectacularly detailed, the Poler Limited edition AWOL from Specialized is the perfect bike for some serious adventure.

 

AWOL Poler Specs

Hit the Trail – CAMBA Trails Cable / Hayward, WI

If all you know about Chequamegon and the Cable Hayward area is the big race, take another look at this gem of a trail.

If all you know about Chequamegon and the Cable Hayward area is the big race, take another look at this gem of a trail.

Chances are you’ve heard of Chequamegon if you’ve ridden in Wisconsin or Minnesota for any period of time – you may even have been lucky enough to draw a spot in the annual race of the same name held every September on some the trails. Dubbed as the Singletrack Capital of the Midwest, the Chequamegon Area Mountain Bike Association (CAMBA) trails are an IMBA Ride Center located in the area of the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest. With 6 areas or clusters of trails, it is an area prime for a long weekend of riding, and the Rock Lake trail (Namakagon unit) is considered an Epic ride by the International Mountain Biking Association (IMBA).

Erik’s staff member J.J. sums up the fall riding in the Cable Hayward area like this: “Cable and Hayward area in Wisconsin is one my favorite areas to ride in the fall.  From the firework like colors of the trees to the cooler temperatures (meaning less bugs attacking you), camping and riding is perfect.

Some trails are also open to Fat Bikes come winter time, as well as the American Birkebeiner ski race held every February

Erik's Employees riding the CAMBA trails.

Trail Info

Trail Length: Over 80 miles, with 27 miles as part of the Rock Lake trail, and 44 miles of continuous singletrack from Hayward to cable (Source IMBA). In fact, using double track and other trail types there are over 300 miles of trails! (Source CAMBA Trail Guide)

 

While the area is too large to fit on one map, that's a good problem

While the area is too large to fit on one map, that’s a good problem

Cost:
There is no trail pass required, but like many trails in Minnesota and Wisconsin, the CAMBA trails are volunteer and donation supported, so membership or volunteering is always appreciated. Some trailheads (Rock Lake TH, Sawyer County Forest, Mosquito Brook and OO) require parking fees.

Terrain:
Like much of the area, the Chequamegon National Forest and surrounding areas were created by glaciers, and as a result the area is sculpted into numerous small lakes and hilltops. There can be some steep climbs, and newer sections of the trail are designed in the “Flow” style. these trails are rhythmic in design and can be described as feeling like a roller coaster. As an IMBA Ride Center, however, there’s more than just flow – the variety of terrain available for different types of riders is great considering the overall length of the trail system.

Highlights:
One of JJ’s favorite rides is as follows: “By starting at the Rock Lake trail head you can combine it with other trails that makes up a 30 mile loop.  While it does include some double track ski trail it allows you to ride past Namakagon Town hall and Wilson Lake Trail Heads.  Within the past few years they have completed a section of trail that is singletrack that allows you to ride from Telemark Resort to Hatchery Creek.  It includes more recent types of trails that are called flow trails, super fun sections that will make you smile.  I tend to do the same sections two or three times before continuing my ride. “

We've corrected that whole bike issue - Dave's on an Epic now.

Trail Conditions: For up to date trail conditions, see the CAMBA Website

Directions:

From Minneapolis Saint Paul, there are a number of ways to get to the area, but to reach Cable/Hayward, take I-35 north to Exit 165 and head East on 70 through Rock Creek, Grantsburg, Siren. and Spooner. At Spooner, Follow US-63 East until you reach the town of Hayward continue on this to head to Cable. It’s about 3 hours drive time.

From Madison and Milwaukee, take I-94 West to Eau Claire and take the US-53  North exit (Exit 70) through Chippewa Falls, Rice Lake and Spooner. Turn Right onto US63 on the north end of Spooner and continue on to Hayward and Cable.

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 57 other followers

%d bloggers like this: